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January 10, 2019

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The Chimpanzees of Bossou

nut cracking

Chimpanzees of Bossou are well known for using a stone hammer and anvil to crack open the nuts of the oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis). Among all the tool use behaviors observed in the wild, nut cracking is probably the most sophisticated performed by chimpanzees.

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Behaviors of Chimpanzees in Bossou Research Thematics Research History

Bossou Chimpanzees Facing Crisis

The number of Bossou chimpanzees has decreased to seven (3 males and 4 females) following the death of Velu in March 2017. The Bossou chimpanzee community remains semi-isolated from neighboring groups of chimpanzees; no females have transferred to the Bossou community from neighboring communities in four decades. Three out of the four females in the Bossou community are estimated to be over 50 years old. Their genetic diversity and indeed their survival is now critically threatened.

Note: chimpanzees have a life expectancy of 50 years in the wild.

Green Corridor Project

In January 1997, Professor Matsuzawa and his colleagues launched the “Green Corridor Project" with the goal of connecting the isolated forest fragment in Bossou to the forests of the Nimba Mountains. This was to be achieved by planting trees along a 300m wide and 4km long stretch of savanna extending between these two areas. The aim is to re-establish a flow of migration between the Bossou chimpanzee community and the neighboring Nimba populations.

Video Library   See Index

This section will introduce you to 100+ video clips from our chimpanzee field research site in Bossou and Nimba.

 

Annual Report

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Book, References


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Photos by Cyril Ruoso

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KUPRI

The friends and Ai: The studies on chimpanzee mind Click

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Researchers


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Research Thematics

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Research History


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The Claudia Sousa Memorial Fund for the Advancement of Portuguese Primatology

was founded to encourage Primatological study by Portuguese students. This fund provides financial support for one student, per year, to spend several months in Japan, at both the Primate Research Institute (PRI) and the Wildlife Research Center (WRC). More

Staff in Guinea


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Long Term Research Sites in Africa

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The Chimpanzee


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Behaviors of chimpanzees in Bossou


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Food List


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2014-2015 West Africa Ebola Outbreak

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Nimba

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Other Sites

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Practical Information

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Green Corridor Project


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Threats to the Bossou and Nimba Chimpanzees

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Enviromental Education

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Bossou

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People of Bossou

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Contact

Tetsuro Matsuzawa
Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University
41 Kanrin, Inuyama, Aichi 484-8506, Japan

Please note that our URL has changed to http://greencorridor.info/